Dinger at the New Sutter Walk-In Care

Gary Zavoral, Sutter Health  |  2019-05-17

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Baseball mascots need to be in tip-top shape to bust a move, run the bases and get the crowd excited. So the Sacramento River Cats’ mascot, Dinger, went this week to the most convenient location in Sacramento to get a quick physical: the newest Sutter Walk-In Care.

Designed to make staying healthy easier and more convenient, Sutter Health opened its seventh Walk-In Care clinic in the Sacramento area on Tuesday, April 30. Located in the popular Loehmann’s Plaza at Fair Oaks Boulevard and Fulton Avenue, this Sutter Walk-In Care serves an area that has a few options for the treatment of everyday illnesses and other health needs. These include youth physicals for sports and summer camps, pre-employment physicals for adults, as well as measles and other vaccinations.

The Walk-In Care clinic is located at 2537 Fair Oaks Blvd., Sacramento, and is the seventh Sutter Walk-In Care in the Valley area. Other clinics are located in Citrus Heights, El Dorado Hills, Elk Grove, Rancho Cordova and two clinics in Roseville. It will serve residents of Arden-Arcade, East Sacramento and Carmichael.

“These locations offer easy access to treatment for a whole host of needs, whether it’s treating the flu or an ear infection or wellness services like sports or pre-employment physicals,” said Kelly Foss, Sutter Walk-In Care regional manager. “We hope that by providing more convenient access to care, in places where many people are already running their errands, patients won’t put off getting the care they need to stay healthy.”

Sutter Walk-In Care offers an innovative approach to healthcare:

Nurse practitioners or physician assistants provide treatment for common illnesses, health screenings, vaccinations and wellness services such as smoking-cessation support;

Each location is open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week, with reduced hours on most major holidays. Thanksgiving and Christmas Day are the only days when Sutter Walk-In Care clinics are closed;

Patients can call ahead or visit the Walk-In Care website to save their spot, or simply just walk-in to the location;

Sutter Walk-In Care locations offer a comfortable lobby with outlets to charge laptops or phones, as well as complimentary Wi-Fi, fruit, coffee, tea and fruit-infused water;

Sutter Walk-In Care is available to adults and children 18 months and older – patients do not need to be an existing Sutter Health patient.

Sutter Walk-In Care accepts most major insurance plans, and patients would be responsible for their standard co-pay or co-insurance. For those who prefer to pay out of pocket or have not yet met their deductible, pricing is clear and simple, with a standard office visit at a flat rate of $129.

Sutter is committed to creating numerous access points to care. For the past several years, Sutter has explored new ways to meet consumers where they are for their care needs. In addition to the Sutter Walk-in Care locations, other convenient options include Sutter urgent care centers or video visits, in addition to traditional office visits with a primary care doctor within Sutter’s network of care.

With all of these options, sometimes consumers ask which location is most appropriate. For example, a Sutter Walk-in care visit could help address seasonal allergy needs, while a Sutter urgent care visit could help someone with asthma who is short of breath. For someone suffering from chest pain, an emergency department visit may be best for a patient.

Additional points of access, like Sutter Walk-In Care clinics, also have the potential to relieve pressure on overcrowded emergency rooms.

“We want to reserve emergency departments for complex and life-threatening illnesses, rather than having people with minor medical problems going there because they have no other option,” Foss said. “At the same time, allowing patients to receive non-urgent care and vaccinations quickly, near where they live or work, should help free up doctor-office visits for those with more serious issues.”

While Sutter Walk-In Care provides a wide variety of healthcare services, patients with serious problems or illnesses that require more immediate attention, such as severe cuts or broken bones, should visit an urgent care clinic, or their nearest hospital emergency department.
Additional Sutter Walk-In Care clinics located in the Sacramento Valley:

Citrus Heights: 5406 Sunrise Blvd., Citrus Heights, CA 95610;
El Dorado Hills: 3919 Park Drive, El Dorado Hills, CA 95762;
Elk Grove: 4810 Elk Grove Blvd., Elk Grove, CA 95758;
Roseville: 4010 Foothills Blvd., Roseville, CA 95747;
Roseville: 781 Pleasant Grove Blvd., Roseville, CA 95678;
Rancho Cordova: 4040 Sunrise Blvd., Rancho Cordova, CA 95742.

And how did Dinger do? Besides being a hit with the staff, Dinger was deemed safe to continue his duties during the River Cats season.

To learn more about Sutter Walk-In Care, please visit www.sutterhealth.org/walk-in or call 1-800-972-5547.

Sacramento Life Center Receives $10,000 for Medical Services for Low-Income Pregnant Women

By Kristin Thébaud, Kristin Thébaud Communications  |  2019-05-17

A patient receives an ultrasound at Sacramento Life Center. The nonprofit recently received grants for its free medical services. Courtesy Sacramento Life Center

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Sacramento Life Center in Arden has received $5,000 each from the Leonard Family Foundation and Kelly Foundation to provide free medical services to low-income pregnant women and teen girls through the group’s primary clinic located in the Arden area and its Mobile Medical Clinics that travel throughout the Sacramento area.


“We are grateful to the Leonard Family Foundation and the Kelly Foundation for this generous funding,” said Marie Leatherby, executive director, Sacramento Life Center. “The Sacramento Life Center has seen a 30 percent increase in women and teen girls seeking our services since our move to Arden. The majority of them are low-income, and half have no medical insurance. These grants will help thousands of mothers and their children receive the medical care they need.”


The Sacramento Life Center’s mission is to offer compassion, support, resources and free medical care to women and couples facing an unplanned or unsupported pregnancy. The Sacramento Life Center’s licensed Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic includes a primary clinic and two Mobile Medical Clinics that provide all services for free, including pregnancy tests, STD tests, ultrasounds, peer counseling for men and women, education and resource referrals.


The nonprofit also offers a school-based teen education program, a 24-hour hotline and a program for women seeking support after having an abortion. For more information about the Sacramento Life Center’s Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic, visit www.svpclinic.com.


For more information about the Sacramento Life Center or to make a donation, visit www.saclife.org.
Source Kristin Thébaud Communications

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One Step at a Time

By Cady Nagy-Chow, CRPD  |  2019-03-21

CRPD wins ‘Excellence in Design’ Award for fitness course and launches new program at Lincoln Village Community Park. Photo courtesy CRPD

CRPD Receives Recognition for Dedication to Community Health

RANCHO CORDOVA, CA (MPG) - Cordova Recreation & Park District (CRPD) recently accepted an Excellence in Design award from the California Park and Recreation Society (District 2) for the fitness course addition to Lincoln Village Community Park. Adding to the theme of physical health, CRPD is excited to start offering the Walk With Ease  program to the community at Lincoln Village Community Park beginning April 1, thanks to an instructor training grant from the National Recreation and Park Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They received the award on March 7, 2019.
While CRPD's programs have long been centers of health and wellness in the community, parks and facilities had yet to offer a free workout environment. After the Lincoln Village Community Park walking paths were upgraded last year, the Neil Orchard Senior Activities Center members expressed an interest in “gym-quality” equipment to supplement the District’s aerobic offerings. Inspired by neighboring parks and recreation agencies and their residents, CRPD launched the Outdoor Fitness Course Project a multi-agency, non-profit partnership between the Cordova Recreation and Park District, the City of Rancho Cordova, and the Neil Orchard Senior Activities Center Advisory Board. 

CRPD Park Planner Cristina James, the project lead, spoke to the growing popularity with outdoor fitness courses and how the course will benefit the community. “Research shows that working out in nature and sunlight triggers chemicals in your brain that help you sleep better! After we’d heard from residents and read about mental and physical health benefits like that, we were convinced that providing a fitness course was exactly what the community needed,” Cristina said.

Beyond the health benefits, the District felt that outdoor fitness courses also provide a welcoming social environment, different than that of a traditional gym. “Having fitness equipment outside makes it feel like an adult playground in some ways. We were able to transition empty space into shared, endorphins-producing space that fosters social connection in both the older and younger generations,” Cristina said.


For this project to become a reality, CRPD relied on public outreach to shape the design of the accessible, state-of-the-art, 5-piece course, and funding from the City of Rancho Cordova’s Community Enhancement Fund. With a matching amount and in-kind labor provided by CRPD, the Lincoln Village Community Park fitness course came to life and is now able to provide an environment for thousands of residents to engage in an active lifestyle.

Beyond the course, CRPD’s new Walk with Ease (WWE) program, developed by the Arthritis Foundation, will contribute to increasing activity in community members daily routine. Studies by the Thurston Arthritis Research Center and the Institute on Aging at the University of North Carolina have shown that WWE helps reduce pain and stiffness associated with arthritis, offers benefits for people managing other chronic conditions, contributes to reduced pain, increased balance and strength, increased levels of physical activity, and improved overall health.

“Walking can offer numerous health benefits to people of all ages and fitness levels. It may also help prevent certain diseases and even prolong your life. This grant from NRPA and the CDC allows us to add a new way for community residents to fulfill daily recommended exercise, and all you need to start is a sturdy pair of walking shoes,” District Administrator Patrick Larkin said.

As one of only 40 park and recreation agencies across the country to be awarded the WWE instructor training grant, CRPD’s fitness instructors will receive grant-funded training so they may offer the best level of service to the community. “We are extremely grateful to be the recipient of the WWE grant because it allows us to continue to help our community keep fit in mind, body and spirit,” Heather Schelske, Recreation Supervisor at the Neil Orchard Senior Activities Center, said.

The Walk with Ease program will be offered three times per week for six weeks by certified and trained instructors. The classes are ideally suited for seniors 50+ who are interested in a low-impact exercise program in their local community, especially those looking to manage a chronic condition. The program is scheduled to begin Monday, April 1 at 10:30 a.m. For more information, visit crpd.com/programs/active-senior

About CRPD: Cordova Recreation & Park District is one of the largest independent special districts in Northern California serving over 120,000 residents and four school districts in the greater Sacramento area. CRPD provides over 40 parks and recreational facilities, as well as youth & adult sports, camps, enrichment classes, educational programs and special events for the community. 

California Park and Recreation Society is a membership organization with just over 4,000 members representing the 535 local parks and recreation agencies throughout the state. The mission of CPRS is to advance the profession and its members through education, networking, resources, and advocacy.  Learn more at www.cprs.org.

The National Recreation and Park Association is a national not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing park, recreation and conservation efforts that enhance quality of life for all people. Through its network of more than 60,000 recreation and park professionals and citizens, NRPA encourages the promotion of healthy and active lifestyles, conservation initiatives and equitable access to parks and public space. For more information, visit www.nrpa.org. For digital access to NRPA’s flagship publication, Parks & Recreation, visit www.parksandrecreation.org.

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Intervention Saves Lives

Story and photo by Shaunna Boyd  |  2019-01-04

Rotary Club of Fair Oaks president Bruce Vincent (right) offers guest speaker Dr. Ron Chambers (left) a thank you gift for educating Rotary members about the issue of human trafficking.

Rotary Club Supports Dignity Health’s Fight Against Human Trafficking

FAIR OAKS, CA (MPG) - Clubs throughout the local Rotary District 5180 are funding an education and public awareness campaign to combat human trafficking in the Sacramento region. As part of District 5180, Rotary Club of Fair Oaks is supporting this important project. In an effort to better understand the scope of the problem, they welcomed Dr. Ron Chambers as a guest speaker to their meeting on December 10.

Dr. Chambers is a family physician who is involved in the District 5180 project to combat human trafficking. Dr. Chambers practices through Dignity Health and is the medical director for Mercy Human Trafficking Clinic, a medical safe haven for victims of human trafficking.

In 2014, Dignity Health launched a program to identify victims of human trafficking when they are treated in the healthcare system. This program focuses on victim-centered, trauma-informed care. Every staff member of Mercy Human Trafficking Clinic is trained to identify and respond to signs that a patient has been trafficked. All the doctors, nurses, administrators, and janitors undergo this training.

Dr. Chambers explained that most trafficking victims are treated by healthcare professionals during the time of their abuse, but most are not identified. Dr. Chambers shared a story about one of his current patients, an 18-year-old trafficking victim with a 5-year-olf daughter. The notes in this patient’s chart show that she delivered her daughter in a Dignity Health hospital and that the signs of trafficking were noted but not recognized. She was not identified as a victim at that time. But with the new protocol, “We don’t miss these [signs] anymore,” said Dr. Chambers. Dr. Chambers explained that the goal of the Mercy Human Trafficking Clinic is to create protocols that can be implemented in healthcare programs across the country.

Each year in the United States approximately 1.7 million children run away from home, and only 21% are reported missing by their parents or caregivers. “So for the majority of these kids, the people who are supposed to love and care for them don’t even bother to report them missing,” said Dr. Chambers. They are running away from homes of abuse and neglect, and they end up on the streets. Dr. Chambers explained that the traffickers know where to look for these kids. They give them a place to stay, buy them food and clothes, and make them feel special. Once they’ve gained the victim’s trust, they beat her up, strip her, and then dump her on the side of the road in the cold. Hours later, the trafficker comes back for her; he buys her dinner, gets her a new dress, and takes care of her. Medical professionals refer to this ongoing cycle of reward and punishment as trauma bonding. This traumatic process creates powerful emotional bonds that are extremely resistant to change, which is why the majority of victims who are rescued will return to their abuser up to seven times.

Dr. Chambers explained that the abuse is typically committed against young girls during a time of significant brain development, so the process of trauma bonding literally rewires their brains. “That’s why when I see a young girl on the streets I don’t think ‘Oh, she’s making bad choices.’ I think, ‘She was never rescued.’”  But intervention and treatment can change everything for these victims. Dr. Chambers said, “Survivors go through horrific trauma, but they can heal…Intervention saves lives.”

After Dr. Chambers’ speech, he answered questions from the Rotary members. One member recounted an experience when he might have encountered a trafficking victim when he was driving his car one morning. He said he didn’t know what to do and regrets that he didn’t offer her some assistance. He asked, “What should I have done to help her?”

Dr. Chambers said that without education or training to effectively help a trafficking victim, offers of assistance can sometimes put the victim at greater risk from their abuser. “The best way to help is to memorize the phone number for the National Human Trafficking Hotline: 888-373-7888.”

One member said that 23 years ago her 5-year-old daughter was almost taken by traffickers. She arrived at the bus stop just as a man and woman were approaching her daughter to try to get her in their car. She said that law enforcement declined to pursue a case against this couple at that time, and six years later the couple attempted to abduct students from Northridge Elementary. She said they were eventually arrested in Nevada after they were caught with a child in their car. She said she hopes things have changed in law enforcement in the past 20 years, but “it doesn’t sound like there has been a coordinated effort.”

Another member explained her strong support for the District’s project to combat human trafficking, stating, “They didn’t choose this. They’re real victims.”

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SilverSneakers Fitness Program Improves Older Adult's Physical and Mental Health

NewsUSA  |  2018-02-15

For more information about SilverSneakers, go to www.silversneakers.com.

(NewsUSA) - Joanne C. was 74 when she had a stroke two years ago that left her paralyzed on the entire right side of her body. She refused to

accept that she'd end up in a wheelchair and began rehabilitation, determined to get her life and

body back to where it was before her stroke.

Joanne's hard work paid off. She has regained much of her strength and movement and

can walk again. In large part, she credits her SilverSneakers exercise classes - offered through

her HumanaChoice® PPO, a Medicare Advantage preferred provider organization (PPO) health plan - as key to her successful recovery.

Being a SilverSneakers member helped keep Joanne in good physical condition before

her stroke. "SilverSneakers helped me be familiar with many of the exercises they had me do in

physical therapy and gave me the confidence and strength to persevere through a difficult rehab

process," Joanne says.

Numerous studies, including Tivity Health's SilverSneakers Annual Member Survey of 2016,

confirm that exercising, especially with others, improves older adults' physical and mental

health.1,2, 3

However, there are challenges that prevent many Medicare beneficiaries from joining gyms and

fitness classes.

By offering SilverSneakers through its Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, Humana is

working to overcome those barriers so more people with Medicare can benefit from

exercising.

For those on a fixed income, joining a gym can be expensive. SilverSneakers

provides gym access at no additional cost to many of Humana's MA members across the country,

including those in Florida and Texas. SilverSneakers has partnered with almost 14,000 fitness and

wellness centers around the U.S. and, with national reciprocity, SilverSneakers members can go to

any one of those facilities.

The program is designed with the Medicare population in mind and taught by

certified instructors who offer classes and modifications for all fitness levels. These instructors

are specifically trained to help members avoid stress-related injuries to muscles and

joints.

There's also a wide variety of classes offered, including circuit training, yoga,

Latin dance and even an outdoor boot camp. SilverSneakers members also have access to all of a

facility's amenities, which can include a range of exercise equipment, weight rooms and swimming

pools.

"According to Tivity Health's annual survey, SilverSneakers has made a significant

difference in the lives of many of our Medicare Advantage members, not only in their physical

health, but also in their social life," says Lauri Kalanges, M.D., Humana's Medical Director

of Medicare Products for the Mid-Atlantic Region.

Tivity Health's Annual Member Survey of 2016 found that 91 percent of SilverSneakers

participants reported an improved quality of life. SilverSneakers has had a substantial impact on

the health of its participants, reducing hospitalizations and the risk of depression.3

For more information about SilverSneakers, go to www.silversneakers.com.

Humana is a Medicare

Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS organization with a Medicare Contract.  Enrollment in any Humana plan

depends on contract renewal.  This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact

the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Benefits may

change each year.  SilverSneakers is not offered on all Humana MA plans in all areas.

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(NewsUSA) - Many people assume that it is a normal part of the

aging process, but no one should resign themselves to foot pain.

According to the The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), some foot problems

are hereditary, but many others result from cumulative neglect and abuse. Gaining weight can affect

bone and ligament structure. In fact, women suffer four times more foot problems than men, and a

lifetime of wearing high heels can leave a painful legacy.

Normal wear and tear alters foot structure. With age and use, feet spread and lose

cushioning. According to the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, one-sixth of nursing home

patients need assistance to walk, while another one-fourth cannot walk. Seeking professional

treatment for foot pain can help senior citizens enjoy a higher quality of life, not to mention

increased mobility and independence.

"Foot pain can limit a senior citizen's ability to participate in social

activities or work," said Dr. Ross Taubman, president of the APMA. "Even worse, foot problems can

lead to debilitating knee, hip and lower back pain."

Podiatric physicians serve in foot clinics, nursing homes and hospitals across the

country, where they help keep older patients on their feet. The APMA offers these tips to older

Americans hoping to walk pain-free:

-Remeasure your feet every time you buy new shoes. Feet expand with age, so you

can't assume that your shoe size will remain constant. Shop for shoes in the afternoon -; feet

swell through the day.

-Keep walking. Feet strengthen with exercise, and walking is the best exercise for your

feet.

-Choose your legwear carefully. Don't wear stockings with seams. Never wear constricting

garters or tie your stockings in knots.

 

-Bathe your feet daily in lukewarm water. Use a mild soap that contains moisturizers.

After washing your feet, pat them dry and massage them with lotion. Inspect your feet for redness,

swelling and cracks or sores, which require a doctor's attention. Do not cut off corns, and only

trim nails straight across.

-See a podiatrist at least once a year. For more information, visit APMA's Web site at

www.apma.org.

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New Ways to Improve the Way You Feel

StatePoint Media  |  2018-01-29

(StatePoint) Nearly 25 million Americans experience daily physical discomfort, according to the National Institutes of Health, which can affect mood, mobility and quality of life.

While the reasons for discomfort vary, the way it is experienced doesn’t -- peripheral nerves are responsible for delivering sensory information, such as itch, temperature change and physical pressure to the brain.

With this in mind, experts are identifying new ways to promote nerve health and comfort by inhibiting inflammatory compounds in nerve cells, and at the same time, encouraging healthy neurotransmitter levels in the brain.

They have discovered that a fatty acid called palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), produced naturally by the body as part of a healthy inflammatory and immune response, inhibits the secretion of inflammatory compounds from mast cells, a type of white blood cell. As we age, our number of mast cells decreases, causing our remaining mast cells to work harder. That can make them overly sensitive, activating inflammatory processes linked to nerve discomfort.

“By inhibiting inflammatory compounds released by mast cells, PEA promotes the body’s natural response to uncomfortable nerve stimuli at the cellular level,” says Michael A. Smith, M.D., senior health scientist and spokesperson for Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Life Extension.

Smith points out that it is now possible to take PEA in supplement form. One option is Life Extension’s ComfortMAX, a dual-action nerve support supplement which contains both PEA as well as Honokiol, a naturally occurring lignan compound derived from magnolia that is shown to support “calming” receptors in the brain, known as GABA receptors, which affect the way the brain perceives discomfort.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and these products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease, however, many experts believe they can be effective in pain management. More information can be found at www.lecomfortmax.com.

“It’s only natural to think topically or locally when we wish to inhibit discomfort. However, taking in the bigger picture could mean more effective relief,” says Dr. Smith.

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